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Published in Volume 11, Issue 3 -

Chapter Five - Administration of Colleges of Education in Nigeria: Problems and Solutions

Usman Al-amin

Languages: English

DOI: 10.17160/josha.11.3.971

In Chapter Five, Al-amin identifies the problems and solutions to the administration of colleges of education in Nigeria. According to Al-amin, some of these major challenges are inadequate funding, poor infrastructure, inadequate staff, and ineffective management. Therefore, he recommends the need for increased funding, improved infrastructure, recruitment of qualified staff, and effective management strategies as possible solutions to these challenges. He finally concludes that addressing these challenges would enhance the quality of education and training provided by colleges of education in Nigeria, leading to the development of a more skilled and productive workforce.


435 432
Published in Volume 11, Issue 3 -

Chapter Four - Problems and Solutions of Muslim Girls’ Child Education in Nigeria

Usman Al-amin

Languages: English

DOI: 10.17160/josha.11.3.969

In Chapter Four, Al-amin identifies the challenges hindering the state of girls' education in Nigeria and proposes possible solutions to these problems. He concludes that the Nigerian government needs to implement policies that promote equal opportunities for girls' education, invest in infrastructure development, and prioritize education in the country's budget allocation. Non-governmental organizations should also partner with government agencies to provide scholarships and support services to girls from impoverished backgrounds. He finally suggests that cultural and traditional practices that discriminate against the girl-child need to be addressed through sensitization campaigns and community-based interventions.


629 795
Published in Volume 11, Issue 2 -

Chapter Three - Makarantar Ilmi and its Curriculum in Northern Nigeria

Usman Al-amin

Languages: English

DOI: 10.17160/josha.11.2.968

Makarantar Ilimi and its curriculum occupy a special and important position in the transmission of knowledge in Northern Nigerian society, shedding light on its significance in fostering education, preserving traditional knowledge, and promoting social cohesion. In Chapter Three, Al-amin examines Makarantar Ilimi and its curriculum in the context of northern Nigeria. He argues that understanding its curriculum is essential for appreciating the rich tapestry of education in Nigeria, where traditional and formal systems often coexist and complement each other in shaping the nation's future generations.


851 664
Published in Volume 11, Issue 2 -

JOSHA’s Critical Review of “Von der Guten Wissenschaft zum wissenschaftlichen Fehlverhalten” by Prof. Dr. Ulrich Rommelfanger

Gerhard G. Steinmann, Neher Aseem Parimoo

Languages: English

DOI: 10.17160/josha.11.2.967

Ulrich Rommelfanger’s paper addresses the complex issue of academic misconduct. With respect to claiming financial damage due to plagiarism, he overlooks the fact that, as a rule, the author of the original text had to assign his copyright to the academic publisher before publication. The reader wonders what is the point of all the fuss and the appeal to professors to take action against plagiarism if no copyright holder is demanding damages. From JOSHA's point of view, the fight against data fabrication, deliberate falsification and misinterpretation is much more important. This actually causes immense damage to patients, subsequent research, sponsors and society as a whole. Here, Rommelfanger remains brief and resigned to the lack of effective control by peer reviews.


528 447
Published in Volume 11, Issue 1 -

Chapter Two - A Historical Overview of the Traditional System of Qur’anic Education in Borno

Usman Al-amin

Languages: English

DOI: 10.17160/josha.11.1.966

In Chapter Two, Al-amin attempts to combine both the anthropological and historical approaches to describe the processes of traditional Qur’anic education and scholarship in Borno, especially the recent trends. He examines the origin, types, methods, and stages of Qur’anic education. Therefore, he concludes that the status of Qur’anic education and scholarship in Borno is set for the heights regardless of the socio-cultural challenges and the misconceptions attributed to it.


559 455
Published in Volume 11, Issue 1 -

Chapter One - The Social History of Education in Northern Nigeria

Usman Al-amin

Languages: English

DOI: 10.17160/josha.11.1.964

In Chapter One, Al-amin revisits the dynamics that shaped the evolution of education in Northern Nigeria from pre-colonial times to the present day, with a particular focus on the socio-economic, political, and cultural factors that influenced the nature of educational provision and access. He draws on a wide range of sources to illuminate the complex relationships between education, colonialism, and social change. He further shows how education was used as a tool for social control and how it became a site of resistance and contestation during periods of political upheaval.


635 477
Published in Volume 11, Issue 2 -

JOSHA’s Critical Review of “The Role of the Media in the Construction of Body Image and its Contribution to the Development of Restrictive Anorexia in Female Adolescents” by Alaide V. C. Garcia, Maria E. R. V. Pinheiro

Cinthya Souza Simas

Languages: English

DOI: 10.17160/josha.11.2.963

The research, by Alaide Vitória Cardoso Garcia and Maria Eduarda Rangel Vilela Pinheiro, guided by Fernanda Lima Monteiro, explores how media, particularly social media, significantly influences female adolescent behavior regarding self-esteem and body image, correlating this influence with the rise of restrictive anorexia. The methodology involves an integrative bibliographic review using databases like Google Scholar, Scielo, and LILACS to establish a connection between social media use and anorexia development in female adolescents. The research emphasizes the historical imposition of beauty standards and the intensified impact of contemporary media on body image.


542 639
Published in Volume 11, Issue 2 -

The Underlying Tension in Oscar Wilde’s “The Decay of Lying”

Sara Tóth Martínez

Languages: English

DOI: 10.17160/josha.11.2.960

The object of study of this paper is The Decay of Lying by Oscar Wilde. In The Decay of Lying, Wilde presents the four main theses of his aesthetic philosophy that are the following: Art never expresses anything but itself, all bad Art comes from returning to Life and Nature and elevating them into ideals, Life imitates Art far more than Art imitates Life, Lying, the telling of beautiful untrue things, is the proper aim of Art. (Wilde 1905, 83-85) These are presented in the form of a Socratic Dialogue. Plato creates this form to present transcendent truths. (Puchner 2010, 30-35) According to Quintus, the aesthetic philosophy of Wilde already creates a tension between the content and the form. (Quintus 1980, 559) This gets accentuated when it comes to the Socratic Dialogue. In this paper, I explore the dimensions of this question, if there is tension, and how Wilde plays with it. I conclude that Wilde, using the Socratic Dialogue, transforms and adapts it to his philosophy.


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Published in Volume 11, Issue 1 -

Editorial Volume 11, Issue 1

Stephan Seiler

Languages: English

DOI: 10.17160/josha.11.1.958

The year 2023 is drawing to a close and, unfortunately, some of us will not remember it too positively. The global upheavals – climate damage, war, migration and more – are casting too much of a shadow over coexistence on the planet. We at Josha Journal and the International Academy of Sciences, Humanities and Arts do not want to join in. We want to continue to be open to the world, curious and collaborative. Not only, but especially in the scientific community, these are values which must be cultivated! The Josha Journal is designed to be international, and we have once again achieved this goal in the year that is drawing to a close. So perhaps the year didn't go so badly after all. We will continue to be open to new knowledge in the new year 2024. You, the Josha community, are welcome to share this with us and get involved! Contributions are always welcome. The teams at the Journal and the Academy, wish everyone a happy new year 2024.


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Published in Volume 11, Issue 1 -

Critical Review of “Ethics & Governance of Artificial Intelligence for Health” by the World Health Organization (WHO)

Rebecca Berger

Languages: English

DOI: 10.17160/josha.11.1.956

This analysis provides a critical review of the World Health Organization (WHO) online course 'Ethical and Governance of Artificial Intelligence for Health'. It provides a comprehensive exploration of the transformative potential of AI in health, with an emphasis on ethics and human rights. The course covers various aspects, including AI applications, ethical principles, resource allocation, bias, cybersecurity and environmental impact. It successfully combines theoretical concepts with practical applications, making it accessible to different audiences, including policymakers and healthcare professionals. The critical review highlights the course's strengths in raising awareness of critical issues but notes its limitations in providing concrete guidelines for ethical AI design and practical strategies for real-world implementation.